Your Hottest Summer 2021 Eastern White Pine Projects

Eastern White Pine woodworking design

What have you all been up to this summer? Oh, just working on some amazing Eastern White Pine projects, if Instagram is any indication! As always, thanks for sharing your work under the hashtag #easternwhitepine. Here are 15 standout projects from the last few months.

This beautiful Eastern White Pine cabin by @garybergeron77: “Cabins going on over 10 years since I began cutting down trees, it became a quitting drinking project and the start of a mostly health obsession with woodworking, made possible by a very patient and supportive partner.”

A gorgeous custom window frame by @rustedpulchritude: “The finished window, made with the sill we were working on in our previous post – made from local eastern white pine and utilizing a reclaimed double-pane window. This window won’t need to open (being installed in an open storage space) so a fixed pane works ok.”

Eastern White Pine planks are playing a role in this old home restoration: “Well we are finally putting on plank. Timber framing in modern times generally means you are framing but also doing finish carpentry, however framing and sheathing at the same time works a new part of the brain. When replacing the plank frame’s sill we opted to change out the trough that held the plank for a rabbet(cut out corner) in which allows the plank to be inserted into the top plates trough then swing into the rabbet. We fixed surviving plank by relieving a mirror of the rabbit. We then fastened everything with structural screws.”

These satisfying dovetails by @jproniewski: “Who doesn’t love some dovetails? I needed more storage space in the shop and I almost bought a tool chest from the D-pot. Then I came to senses and started building my own. Here are some process shots of the carcass. I get all warm and fuzzy inside thinking that this thing will last for a long long time.”

Another stunning project by @rustedpulchritude: “A current WIP: a board made from local eastern white pine, decorated with handcarved apotropaic marks, aka witches or hex marks, believed to be protective of structures (and the people within them) in colonial america, brought as a concept from england. Many were inscribed onto portals through which a spirit might pass – windows, chimneys, etc – by a carpenter or craftsperson, the idea being that evil spirits are confusable and get caught up in the repeating pattern before making it inside. Another independently developed but similar-in-goal object that people might be more familiar with is the Native American/First Nations “dreamcatcher” (asabikeshiinh in Ojibwe) which instead of confusing a spirit would capture it, as if in a spiders web. Another version that I grew up with was the Irish St. Brigid’s Cross, in addition to other superstitious behaviors (throwing bread against doors on New year’s day while reciting a specific saying, etc). Another commonly seen example is Celtic and Scandinavian knotwork, in addition to other unique and fascinating traditions around the world.”

A modern home by @timberblock featuring Eastern White Pine: “As promised, we’re showing you the back of our beautiful brand new Sonoma. This home is the definition of pure contemporary living…inside and out. See more photos, plus get the floor plan. It’s all on our website…the link is in our profile.”

Check out these lovely floors by @vermontplankflooring: “This cozy bedroom features Old Growth Eastern White Pine with Vermont Planks’ Chelsea Finish.⁠”

An old fashioned barn raising by @pinestackjoinery: “Had an amazing weekend raising a barn frame for some very fine folks in Jordan Bay. 22X34’ with two storage lofts. Middle bay is open and will have sliding barn doors on both eave walls. Lean-to rafters and window framing to come.”

A refreshingly simple live edge Eastern White Pine slab project in progress by @mainelumber: “Simple garden table. We used one of our slabs, cut out the heart for stability and added a pair of pretty good looking @naturalgoodsberlin legs. Two matching benches to follow shortly.”

Check out this beauty by @roguefoxcollaborative: “Farmhouse Table and Benches in Eastern White Pine. Rustic Finish. 30”x72”. Small but tough. Buttons have been stress tested through plenty of one person lifting and moving. They strong.”

The underside of a stunning Eastern White Pine floor by @rockheartcabin: “Can you figure out what you are looking at here? I am standing on our basement stairs. You can see the first floor wall and ceiling and then the stairs that go up to the second floor. A feature that I like about them is that they will be open.”

Look at all this beautiful Eastern White Pine! Via @mooselogandtimberframehomes: “Interior photos of our gorgeous full round logs in our southern WI project! What’s your favorite part?”

Woodworking students learn some awesome new skills at @tfgheartwoodschool: “Heartwood students prep the final pieces and cut the last joints needed for putting the cruck frame together!”

This creative use of Eastern White Pine is going to make one cat very happy indeed! Via @round_angle: “Feline Climber Number 3 in production. Easy disassembly and reassembly.”

@kylielittleart shares an impressive project from the esteemed Penland School of Crafts in North Carolina: “I wasn’t planning on sharing all of @penland_wood ‘s summer class pics, but if they continue being this amazing…I won’t be able to help myself. The students built this timber frame in less than 2 weeks with very little experience. All joinery. No hardware.”

Via the @softwoodexportcouncil: “The classical rural New Hampshire home built with wood cut down on their one property and locally source Eastern White Pine, also has other Eco-friendly features such as a rooftop solar array, heat recovery ventilation system and a heat-pump hot water system. The owners note that “Every new home should be seeking Energy Star Certification. As long as your not cutting corners, meeting the requirements is easy and the amount of documentation needed is minimal as compared to other certifications such as LEED. And compared to other certification programs, Energy Star pays you and not the other way around.”